Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida

  • 283 Pages
  • 1.69 MB
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by
J.-P. Wayenborgh , Oostende, Belgium
Eye -- Diseases -- Treatment -- Early works to 1800., Eye -- Physiology -- Early works to 1800., Eye Diseases -- therapy., Ocular Physio
StatementJulius Hirschberg ; translated into English, commented, enlarged and illustrated by Richey L. Waugh, Jr.
GenreEarly works to 1800.
SeriesHirschberg history of ophthalmology -- v. 8
ContributionsHirschberg J. 1843-1925., Waugh, Richey L.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRE46 .A3213 2000
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 283 :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20800048M

Aëtius of Amida was a Byzantine-Greek physician and medical writer, particularly distinguished by the extent of his erudition. He is particularly noted for being a creator of a large medical encyclopedia in 16 books, which has survived in its entirety, and also for describing a method for removing tattoos.

The History of Ophthalmology - The Monographs volume 8 The Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida. written by: J. Hirschberg translated by: R.L. Waugh Jr. ISBN ISBN Publication year: Price: € / US $ This publication is part of the History of Ophthalmology - The Monographs series.

Add to cart. Continuing the introductions of the major medical compilations, this time Aetius of Amida’s Medical Books (Libri Medicinales).

Other People’s Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida book. If Aetius wrote an introduction to his work, it no longer exists. Instead, we get notes scribbled in manuscripts, some with summaries of the whole work, some just the first two books.

Aëtius of Amida, Aetii medici graeci contractae. Dedication. Aëtius of Amida was held in great esteem by Renaissance physicians and by the translator of this book, the renowned Janus Cornarius, who considered Aëtius the best of medical writers.

Like Oribasius, Aëtius studied in Alexandria in the Byzantine period. Aetius was born in the city of Amida (today Diyarbakir, Turkey) which is located upon the river Tigris in Mesopotamia (Georgakopoulos ). Amida in those times belonged to the authorized area of the big city of Antiochia.

This is the reason why one of the names of Aetius is “Aetius of Antiochia.” He was probably a Christian (Αckerknecht. Geburtsh lfe Und Gyn kologie Bei A tios Von Amida (Buch 16 Der Sammlung): Ein Lehrbuch Aus Der Mitte Des 6.

Jahrhunderts N. Chr. Nach Den Codices in Der Kgl. Bibliothek Zu Berlin (Besonders Den Sammlungen C. Weigels) (Paperback) by Aetius Of Amida and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Aetius of Amida (6th century CE) is the creator of a large medical encyclopaedia in 16 books, which has survived in its entirety.

Not all books exist in a printed edition, though. It is written in Greek and consists almost exclusively of excerpts taken from earlier Greek medical writers Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida book as Galen). Aëtius of Amida (/ eɪ ˈ iː ʃ ə s /; Greek: Ἀέτιος Ἀμιδηνός; Latin: Aëtius Amidenus; fl.

mid-5th century to mid-6th century) was a Byzantine Greek physician and medical writer, particularly distinguished by the extent of his erudition. His birth and death years are not known, but his writings appear to date from the end of the 5th century or the beginning of the 6th.

Geburtsh lfe Und Gyn kologie Bei A tios Von Amida (Buch 16 Der Sammlung): Ein Lehrbuch Aus Der Mitte Des 6. Jahrhunderts N. Chr. Nach Den Codices in Der Kgl. Bibliothek Zu Berlin (Besonders Den Sammlungen C. Weigels) (Paperback) di Aetius Of Amida e una grande selezione di libri, arte e articoli da collezione disponibile su 1.

Author(s): Aetius,of Amida.; Hirschberg,J(Julius),; Waugh,Richey L Title(s): The ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida/ Julius Hirschberg ; translated into. Aetius of Amida (6 th century CE) is the creator of a large medical encyclopaedia in 16 books, which has survived in its entirety.

Not all books exist in a printed edition, though. It is written in Greek and consists almost exclusively of excerpts taken from earlier Greek medical writers (such as Galen). Aëtios von Amida (auch Aécio, Aëtius Amidenus; Antiochenus; * in Amida, Mesopotamien; † ) studierte Medizin in Alexandria und wurde Hofmedikus von Justinian I.

in Byzanz. (de) Aëtius of Amida (Greek: Ἀέτιος Ἀμιδηνός; Latin: Aëtius Amidenus; fl. mid-5th century to mid-6th century) was a Byzantine Greek physician and. Ophthalmology Of The Ancients by H. Magnus, Ophthalmology Of The Ancients Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format.

Download Ophthalmology Of The Ancients books, Language: en Pages: Books about The Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida.

Language: en Pages: The Eye and the Beholder. Authors: Hannelore Hägele.

Details Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida FB2

Ophthalmology of the Ancients was published in 2 volumes in and The Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida, which was published inincluded his translator's afterword and expanded commentary and illustrations. He is survived by 3 brothers, 3 children, 3 grandchildren, a great-grandchild, and his wife.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. Die Augenheilkunde des Aetius aus Amida Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

Ophthalmology Publisher Leipzig: Veit Collection. Aetius d'Amide, Aetios ca. Jh von Amida Aetius, of Amida Aëtius Amidenus Aeci, d'Amida Ae͏̈tius, Amidenus, caca Aetios von Amida ca. Aeci Metge bizantí probablement del segle VI Aecjusz (ok. ) Aetius. Aetios, von Amida, ca talet Aetius de Amida, VIAF ID: (Personal).

Aëtius Amidenus, litteris Graecis Ἀέτιος Ἀμιδηνός, ex Amida oriundus, scriptor de re medica Graecus, saeculo V exeunte natus, anno circiter mortuus est. Opus encyclopaedicum confecit in libros XVI divisum, pluribus rebus e Galeno et Oribasio demptis, multis autem ex aliorum libris hodie deperditis.

Description Ophthalmology of Aëtius of Amida FB2

Versiones Latinae ab Ioanne Baptista Montano et Iano Cornario saepe a. Aetius, von Amida Aetius Aezio di Amida Aezio, d'Amida Amidenus, Aetius Amidenus, Aetius Aécio, de Amida ’Aétios ho ’Amidīnós ’Aétios ’Amidīnós Field of activity: Medical Author Physician Notes: Iatricorum Book XI.

URN: urn:cts:greekLit:tlgtlg Word Count: Aetius of Amida. Overview. Works: works in publications in 8 languages and 1, library holdings Cum eorundem conciliationibus by Nicolò Rorario (Book) Alcune ricette di Aezio d'Amida e l'ambiente superstizioso de V-VII secolo by G.

P Della Capanna (Book) Oeuvres by Nicandre (Book) Aetii Amideni: Libri. usual way in which one cites Aetius of Amida, even though the most recent editor of Books 1–8 (Alexander Olivieri [, ]) simply titles the work Libri medicinales. We still depend in large part on Cornarius’ Latin translation for much of Books IX through XVI.

7Tetrabiblon16 = Cornarius pp–, titled De conceptus ac partus ratione. CONCLUSIONS: Aetius of Amida gives significant information about surgical approaches to diseases of the womb, the most detailed of any medical writer of his epoch. His descriptions, following the Hippocratic and mainly the Hellenistic and Roman traditions, influenced Islamic and European medicine, and through them the rest of the world.

Aëtius of Amida (, Mesopotamia [now Diyarbakir, Turkey], fl, ca.

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a.d. ) medicine. Aëtius had the title comes obsequii, which indicates that he had a relatively high rank, possibly of a military nature, at this title seems not to have been introduced until the reign of Justinian I, Aëtius cannot have lived before the sixth century, It is sometimes supposed that he was.

Thesis: Aetius of Amida on Diseases of the Head: A Translation and Commentary of Libri medicinales, Book VI. My dissertation project aims at translating and commenting on the sixth book of the Libri medicinales (ἰατρικοὶ λόγοι) of Aetius of Amida, which deals with diseases of the head.

Aetius lived in the first half of the sixth century AD and presumably worked as a court. Aetius of Amida on diseases of the brain – an analysis of parts of the sixth book of his Libri medicinales with introduction, translation and commentary Aetius of Amida lived in the first half of the sixth century, and wrote a treatise in sixteen books commonly known as the Libri medicinales.

In present-day English books, when an eye color is described, the color is specified as green about 12% of the time. 15 Thus, the present-day reader might find it implausible that a culture could fail to agree that an eye color resembles the color of green leafy plants.

But this comparison appears to be a relatively recent event in English as well. If the practice of ophthalmology had hardly advanced during the long centuries that followed Greek medicine at its height in the Rome of Galen, it had little to gain at the Renaissance by looking backward.

Further advance in ophthalmology was made possible by the study of the anatomy of the eye, and by an understanding of the mechanism of vision. Aëtius of Amida (Greek: Ἀέτιος Ἀμιδηνός; Latin: Aëtius Amidenus; fl. mid-5th century to mid-6th century) was a Byzantine Greek physician and medical writer, particularly distinguished by the extent of his erudition.

Historians are not agreed about his exact date. He is placed by some writers as early as the 4th century; but it is plain from his own work that he did not write.

Aetius’ first. and second books are taken up entirely with drugs. The first book contains a list of drugs arranged according to the Greek alphabet. In the third book other remedial measures, dietetic, manipulative, and even operative, are suggested.

In these are included veneseetion, the opening of an artery, cupping, leeches, and the like. He had a major role in the publication of the first two volumes of the Cambridge Galen Translations, Psychological Writings () and Works on Human Nature () and in the preparation of four other manuscripts in the series.

He also contributed to the forthcoming translation and commentary of Aetius of Amida’s Libri medicinales, book I and II. Genre/Form: Early works Early works to Additional Physical Format: Online version: Aetius, of Amida.

Aetios of Amida; the gynaecology and obstetrics of the VIth century, A.D. Worldwide, and especially in Asia, myopia is a major vision-threatening disorder.

From AD on, to prevent myopia, authors warned against near work without sufficient pauses. There was an abundance of theories about the causes of myopia, the most common one being the necessity of extra convergence on nearby work with thickened extraocular muscles and elevated intraocular pressure.Oribasii Sardiani Synopseos ad Eustathium filium lib.

novem. Parisiis: In officina Audoeni Parvi, Fulltext online Oribasius, Oribasii Sardiani Synopseos. Oribasius, Oribasii Sardiani the frog within the initial C.Aetius *)Ae/tios, (Aetius), a Greek medical writer, whose name is commonly but incorrectly spelt Aetius.

Historians are not agreed about his exact date. He is placed by some writers as early as the fourth century after Christ; but it is plain from his own work that he did not write till the very end of the fifth or the beginning of the sixth, as he refers (tetrab.